Archive for the ‘Diagrams & Charts’ Category

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship

October 20th, 2012
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USS Independence (LCS-2) is the lead ship for the Independence variant of the littoral combat ship class. She will be the sixth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the concept of independence. The design was produced by the General Dynamics consortium for the Navy's LCS program, and competes with the Lockheed Martin-designed Freedom variant.

Independence was delivered to the Navy at the end of 2009, and is a modular high speed corvette intended for operation in the littoral zone with a small crew. It is optimized for deploying and tending off-board systems, manned and unmanned; and takes on various capability profiles with the installation of a mission package, missions to include finding and destroying mines, hunting submarines in and near shallow water, and engaging in surface combat against boats, but not against warships. The ship is a trimaran design with a wide beam above the waterline, which provides the space needed for it to have a larger flight deck than is found on any of the much larger destroyers and cruisers in the US Navy, as well as a large hangar and a similarly large mission bay below. The trimaran hull configuration also exhibits low hydrodynamic drag, allowing efficient operation on two diesel powered water jets at speeds up to 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph), and high speed operation on two gas turbine powered water jets at speeds up to a sustainable 44 knots (81 km/h; 51 mph), with speed crests exceeding that.

See complete entry at Wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Independence_(LCS-2)

 

Most of the images below are ultra high resolution, poster sized images.
USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

 

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

 

 

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

 

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

 

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

USS Independence LCS-2, Littoral Combat Ship, Military Scale Model, Boat Model

 

 

 

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Submarine Size Comparison Diagrams

September 18th, 2010
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The first military submarine was Turtle (1775), a hand-powered egg-shaped device designed by the American David Bushnell  to accommodate a single person. It was the first verified submarine capable of independent underwater operation and movement, and the first to use screws for propulsion. During the American Revolutionary War, Turtle (operated by Sgt. Ezra Lee, Continental Army) tried and failed to sink the British warship HMS Eagle, flagship of the blockaders in New York harbor on September 7, 1776.[26]
The Nautilus (1800)

In 1800, France built a human-powered submarine designed by American Robert Fulton, the Nautilus. The French eventually gave up on the experiment in 1804, as did the British when they later considered Fulton's submarine design.

During the War of 1812, in 1814, Silas Halsey lost his life while using a submarine in an unsuccessful attack on a British warship stationed in New London harbor.

The Hipopotamo was the first submarine in South America. It was first tested in Ecuador on September 18, 1837. It was built by Jose Rodriguez Lavandera, who successfully crossed the Guayas River in Guayaquil accompanied by Jose Quevedo. Rodriguez Lavandera enrolled in the Navy in 1823, becoming a Lieutenant by 1830. The Hipopotamo crossed the Guayas on two more occasions, but it was then abandoned because of lack of funding and interest from the government.

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Diagrams & Charts, Naval, Reference Material, submarines | Posted by Admin